The Broome Bird Observatory

Shorebird Capital of Australia.

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Welcome to BirdLife Australia's

Broome Bird Observatory

Established in 1988 by the RAOU (Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union), now BirdLife Australia, as a research and education facility, our principle aim is to work for the conservation of the migratory shorebirds which visit Roebuck Bay.

We’re passionate about the amazing birds that visit and live in globally-unique Roebuck Bay, and we strive to share this passion with the people of Australia and abroad to encourage the preservation of this international treasure, and our flyway, for generations to come.

The observatory is located on the north-west coast of Australia on the shores of Roebuck Bay: Just 25 kilometres east of the town of Broome and some 2,400 road kilometres north of Perth. We are currently open for accommodationcamping and tours.

We're entirely self-funded.

The Broome Bird Observatory exists to facilitate research focused on Roebuck Bay and migratory waders in the East-Asian Australasian Flyway, and to provide a point of contact and education to the public, both locally and globally.

To fund ourselves we host courses and tours throughout the year, and provide accommodation in the form of basic units, a self-contained cottage, and an un-powered campground with excellent, fully-equipped camp kitchen.  

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We're devoted to shorebird research.

I just don’t believe it…it’s incredible
…waders as far as the eye can see!
— Clive Minton, first AWSG expedition to Roebuck Bay and Eighty Mile Beach (Flight of the Emu)
Dr. Clive Minton releasing a Pied Oystercatcher - photographer unknown 

Dr. Clive Minton releasing a Pied Oystercatcher - photographer unknown 

The Broome Bird Observatory hosts researchers from around the globe with a strong focus on Roebuck Bay and the East Asian Australasian Flyway.  There are often ways that you can get involved in research that happens at the observatory such as Global Flyway Networks'(GFN) Dry Season Cannon Netting and the annual Australasian Waders Study Group (AWSG) Northwest Expedition.  

The Broome Bird Observatory has gained the status of the worldwide hottest location in migratory shorebird activities; it has inspired conservation and benthic and shorebird research worldwide. It deserves as much support as we can give it: locally, nationally and internationally.
— Dr Theunis Piersma, Dutch Sea Research Institute (NIOZ)
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